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Cezar_TheScribe

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Dianne Feinstein and the Senate age question

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I don't agree with everything in this article. But, it's past time to have term limits. 

A law that both parents have to have been born in America for any political activity.

No one who holds duel-citizenship should be able to hold any power in America.

Must be pro-First and Second Amendment.


California Sen. Dianne Feinstein is running for her fourth full U.S. Senate term at age 78. If re-elected, the Democrat will be 85 at the end of a six-year term, placing her among the oldest senators in an institution famous for politicians who stay in office well past their shelf life.

Feinstein's age - she is the fifth-oldest current senator - presents voters with a decision about whether evidence of the mental and physical decline of people in their 80s applies to the most-popular politician in the nation's most-populous state.

"The fact is, we do decline cognitively as we age, partly because we are losing a lot of brain matter," he said. "I will oversimplify, but roughly by the time we're in our 70s, the brain has atrophied quite a bit, so roughly we've lost 20 percent to 25 percent of brain volume by that time."

Intelligence, memory and learning ability all decline with age.

"Word-finding gets tougher and tougher; it kind of scares me," said Epstein, 58, who admitted to sometimes forgetting his children's names. "There are enormous differences individual to individual. But you can't ignore age, because you want your leaders to be highly capable cognitively."


http://www.sfgate.com/politics/article/Dianne-Feinstein-and-the-Senate-age-question-2355612.php




Cezar_TheScribe

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Should there be an age limit for Congress?

John McCain's incoherent questioning of James Comey earlier this year had many wondering about the Senator's mental capabilities at age 81. McCain isn't the oldest member of Congress: Orrin Hatch is 83, Dianne Feinstein is 84 and John Conyers is 88. Many argue there should be age limits for members of Congress as cognitive impairment is a reality of advance aging. But others argue it is unfair to discriminate against older politicians, and the voters should get to decide how old is too old. What do you think? 

In Vox , Harold Pollack addresses the difficult topic of aging politicians losing cognitive ability. Pollack notes 23 senators are at least 70, and seven are 80 or older. While discussing age and mortality may be uncomfortable, Pollack argues it is a statistical reality that the risk of dementia doubles every five years after an individual turns 70, and we have seen examples of this play out in Congress.
Rumors regularly hit Washington about the cognitive function of various senators. Strom Thurmond served to age 100, and was visibly infirm and unable to perform his senatorial duties toward the end of his service.

If older members of Congress reliably become unable to perform their duties, shouldn't we consider enforcing age limits?

Disruptive medical tragedies are an unavoidable statistical consequence of this trend, as is the risk that key political actors will develop cognitive impairment. There's no easy solution to the problem, but it demands a frank conversation. Reforms such as term appointments for justices could help with the problem, but it's just as important to try to shift societal norms to take more seriously some elemental realities of human aging.
But former U.S. congresswoman Eva M. Clayton argues in The New York Times that age is not the problem. Clayton believes it is up to the voters to decide how old is too old, and setting age limits means potentially discriminating against extremely talented and experienced politicians. What matters most is policy and performance, not an arbitrary number. Any effort to enforce age limits is to take away the right of voters to choose who they want to represent them.
If Congress focuses on improving our economy, reforming our broken immigration system, providing access to health care to the working poor or creating an open dialogue around gun safety measures, then perhaps we could focus on these issues as well -- and not on the frivolity of age.




https://articles.silive.com/news/2017/12/should_there_be_an_age_limit_f_1.amp
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